Why you’ll love a perfumed garden

The heady scent of frangipani blossoms on a warm topical evening, the romantic fragrance of a vintage rose, the essence of eucalyptus after a storm.

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The heady scent of frangipani blossoms on a warm topical evening, the romantic fragrance of a vintage rose, the essence of eucalyptus after a storm. There is certainly a special allure to a perfumed garden, the sweet scents that come from blooms and foliage, filling the air with their aromatic charm.

There are many varieties of perfumed plants to choose from – some of the more familiar blooms, like roses, jasmine, lilac, lavender, wisteria and gardenia, have long been favoured for their fragrance and beauty. Several native plants including gum and myrtle provide lemon-scented aromas and beautifully scented herbs like thyme, mint and rosemary, should be planted where they can be brushed past so their fragrant oils can be released.

When planning out a perfumed garden, position and timing is important. Blooms all flowering at the same time could be overpowering, so stagger the position of strongly scented plants among other not so perfumed blooms and research their flowering season so that different blooms can be enjoyed throughout the year.

Plants release their fragrance when they are rustled by a breeze or brushed by on a pathway. Consider the location of your perfumed plantings and the prevailing breezes to ensure their fragrance can be released to where you want to enjoy them; in an entry, near a window or verandah or by an outdoor terrace.

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